Sharks have declined by 71% since 1970

Sharks and Rays were once prolific in our oceans. But rays and sharks have declined by 71% since 1970.

A-mako-shark-caught-by-fishermen-just-outside-Sydney-Harbor-Australia.

In just the last half-century, humans have caused a staggering, worldwide drop in the number of sharks and rays that swim the open oceans, scientists have found in the first global assessment of its kind, published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

Oceanic sharks and rays have declined by 71 percent since 1970, mainly because of overfishing. The collapse is probably even more stark, the authors point out, because of incomplete data from some of the worst-hit regions and because fishing fleets were already expanding in the decades before they started their analysis.

“There is a very small window to save these iconic creatures,” said Nathan Pacoureau, a marine biologist at Simon Fraser University in Canada and the study’s lead author. More than three quarters of oceanic shark and ray species are now threatened with extinction, jeopardizing marine ecosystems and the food security of people in many nations.

Our oceans may still look beautiful but they are dying in many ways from reefs to large fish and mammals to almost invisible plankton.

The research offers the latest data point in what is a dismal trajectory for Earth’s biodiversity. From butterflies to elephants, wildlife populations have crashed in recent decades and as many as a million species of animals and plants are at risk of extinction.

The above four paragraphs were copied directly from a New York Times article published on January 27, 2021. Read this article in full.

Red Knots in Delaware Bay are in the Steepest Decline in Years

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Read more about the on-going extinction on our planet

Read more about the on going extinction of animals on our planet

Birds are going extinct all over the world by the millions

The ongoing insect extinction is more than serious

Red Knots have decreased from 90,000 to just 7000 in the last 40 years in Delaware Bay

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More images about the fragility of animal life on our earth

Global-Warming-Is-Driving-Polar-Bears-Toward-Extinction-Researchers-Say
Polar-Bear-on-icflow-in-Artic
Bison were once killed on the American plains down to the last few individuals. Now thanks to energetic recovery programs they are out of danger for the time being. This image was taken of The-National-Bison-Range-in-Montana-now-managed-by-the-Confederated-Salish-and-Kootenai-Tribes.
One-species that-once-lived-in-the-Hadejua-Nguru-Wetlands-in-Nigeria, that is now extinct.
Elephants are Africa are being killed in large number for their tusks. The same is true for Rinos

Post summary: In just the last half-century, humans have caused a staggering, worldwide drop in the number of sharks and rays that swim the open oceans, scientists have found in the first global assessment of its kind, published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

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